Attracting Talent through Job Postings

Attacting talent through job postings isn’t as easy as just posting your internal job description and hoping for the best.  This article posted by Nethire does a good job of going over some of the basics you should think about when trying to attract the right talent.  Below I’ve outlined the main five points in the article but keep in mind that our focus is on the engineering & manufacturing industry. 1) Know the difference between a job description and job advertisement This is a great point and the article outlines why.  Here at JP Recruitment, the job posting on our website is not typically exactly what is sent to us by the client.  Sometimes it can be completely different.  We have 2-3 pages of notes from when we sat down with our client and that usually doesn’t reflect the job description.  We post what we think will attract the talent the client needs. 2) Do NOT use a unique job title that is only applicable to the company This is simple and straight forward.  Nothing worse when you see a resume of a candidate that has really complicated job titles on it.  Why would it be different for attracting talent? 3) Do NOT forget to include vital information Application instructions is probably the one that stands out the most to me when attracting talent.  Make this as straight forward and easy as pos  Companies may not want to include their name if it is on a job board but it also can certainly be a good attraction tool.  Things like job location can help the filtering of candidates...

Improving Your LinkedIn Profile

Improving LinkedIn profile’s is a very important topic if you are open to new opportunities in the engineering & manufacturing industry.  It can help your own personal “online brand”, act as a resume to companies without you even applying, can give you a different level of references as well as help grow your network for when you make a more aggressive search. I read this article today and it prompted this blog post.  I’ve outlined the main points you should focus on your profile from it below: Industry groups Search of rival companies Observing who is recommending and endorsing people Finding similar people to those they already know Finding alumni from specific colleges Using Google to search LinkedIn’s public profiles I don’t think companies in the manufacturing sector across Canada focus on the alumni part – I believe this is more in the US.  In my entire recruitment career, I’ve never been asked to focus on people from a specific school. I would also essentially fill out your career history with everything from your resume.  Be sure to outline what your current/past employers manufactures, how big the facility you work at is & the market it sits in.  On top of that, focus on key achievements that you accomplished and quantify those achievements. Lastly, and this may seem obvious, grow your network! What are you doing to ensuring your LinkedIn profile is...

The Importance of Strong Leadership

The importance of strong leadership is an obvious part of growing a good business.  This article that I read, “Why a Bad Boss is Bad for Employer Brank”, is a great eye opener for a lot of companies out there.  It discusses the some points on Talent Attraction/Retention, Brand Reputation, Morale, Culture & Management by Fear. As a recruiter in the engineering & manufacturing space, I come across these topics on a daily basis and have even experienced some myself within my career.  There are certainly companies that I can list that I get told by candidates that they do not want to work for.  This is even before I’ve told them about any roles!!!  You definitely do not want to be that type of business.  What are you doing in your current role to prevent this from happening?  It may be worth asking your recruiter what feedback has been.  I know I am speaking with people every day about the manufacturing industry and have a good idea – I imagine others do as well.  All of this has an impact on each of the points listed above.  Not being able to attract the right people leads to bad hires which in turn causes turnover, costs money and creates a bad morale & culture in a business.  We all know that going through a culture change is not easy. What are you doing today to ensure your management team are creating the reputation and culture you want?  I’d like to hear ideas and thoughts of this....

Talent Trends

What the CEO’s from manufacturing companies are telling Trump not only resonates in the US.  For at least the last couple of years now, I have seen it here in Canada as well.  Useful read, so check out the article here. It is becoming harder and harder for manufacturing companies to find the right talent for their needs across Canada.  From our point of view in engineering & manufacturing recruitment, it usually comes in waves.  In one stretch of time, there can be a lot of technical skill-sets on the market and limited jobs versus another moment where there are a lot of jobs and not a lot of manufacturing candidates.  Unfortunately, the latter has become quite a common theme.  It certainly makes my job in the recruitment industry harder – I definitely have to earn my keep. This serves as an important reminder if you are in recruitment or in any type of hiring position in a company.  You need to keep networking!  Networking with people for potential future recruitment or networking and finding referrals of top level talent that you may hire down the road.  Social media can be a major driver in networking so be sure to check us out, all the information can be found on our Useful Links page. What trends are you seeing in your company?  How are you expanding your...

The 12 days of Christmas | Recruitment Edition

Here at JP Recruitment we would like to wish everyone and their families a safe holiday season! We thought we would kick off the Christmas period with 12 tips in finding that next step in your career. “A job that will make you happy.”  This would make the world a better place if everyone would just be happy in their jobs. Going through the recruitment process properly and finding out the information along the way can prevent bad decisions. Hopefully the tips in this blog article will help you find a job that will make you happy. “Two solid references.”  When you are buckled into your job search, make sure you have a couple solid references handy. “References upon request” is all fine and dandy on the resume but ensure you have people that either recruiters or your future employer can talk to and not have to chase up. Also, have their correct contact information. “Three solid questions.”  Once you have secured that all important interview, ensure you have done your research about the company by visiting their website, etc. You should have enough information from the job description, website and recruiter about the role/company to have 3 good questions to ask at the end of the interview. This will show that you are serious about the career change and allow to you to learn more. “Four follow up calls!”  Follow up calls are probably the thing on this list that people do the least. Please do not just apply or email across your resume and hope for the best. It’s important to try to follow up on your application. However, remember people have call display! There is nothing worse when a candidate calls me...

Notice Period

Notice period is something that everyone needs to consider when either looking/accepting a new job but also for current/future employers to be mindful of as well.  This article prompted this blog post mainly because I wanted to ensure that JP Recruitment provided some insight to our clients and candidates on the topic.  Or at least start a discussion!  I am sure in Engineering & Manufacturing recruitment or any other industry – employers or future employers can appreciate my mindset when it comes to notice period.  I always error on the caution that your future employer would want the same courtesy as you are giving the company you are leaving.  I let both parties know this through out the process to ensure it goes as smoothly as possible.  Now, there are certainly instances where you will be walked out the door and I’ve had this happen to me but this isnt anything to be worries about.  I always recommend the usual 2 weeks notice when resigning and if a company needs the extra week – I do not see the harm (unless otherwise outlined in your employment agreement).  Why burn a bridge if you dont have to? What are your thoughts?  Have you had any really good or bad experiences?  Or even some suggestions? We are also open to suggestions on resignation letters to help our future candidates in making their transition.  If you have any ideas, feel free to email them to me at...